Knowledge Base of Eating Disorders

Our knowledge base is a resource dedicated to providing information to individuals and their families about the signs, effects, causes, and treatment options for bulimia nervosa, as well as other eating disorders and co-occurring conditions.


Bulimia Nervosa Awareness

Bulimia nervosa (BN) is a specific type of eating disorder revolving around cycles of binging and purging. Affecting people of all genders, BN has a prevalence of approximately 0.5-1.5%. The disorder can have grave effects on someone’s health, but thankfully, a majority of people who seek treatment for bulimia nervosa are able to recover.


  • Bulimia facts

    5 Bulimia Facts That May Surprise You

    Understanding bulimia facts can help you spot the condition in people who need help. And armed with information, you can help them to get the treatment they need.

  • Person questioning if they have bulimia

    Am I Bulimic? Questions to Ask Yourself 

    Run a search for “bulimia test,” and you’ll get more than 8 million Google results. Should you take one? And what should you do with your score?

  • woman at dentist

    Bulimia & the Teeth: Effects & Signs of Damage

    Bulimia doesn’t technically harm your teeth. But one habit common in people with bulimia can cause extensive dental damage you’ll need a professional to address

  • Medical professional

    How to Treat Bulimia: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals 

    Bulimia is a severe mental health disorder, but it responds to treatment. The sooner you spot the signs and enroll a patient in care, the more likely it is that the person will make a full recovery.

  • Child struggling with bulimia

    How to Help a Child or Teenager With Bulimia

    Knowing how to help someone with bulimia isn’t easy for anyone. It’s especially difficult for parents. 

    Bulimia can touch teenagers; some start eating in unusual patterns long before they qualify for a formal bulimia diagnosis. Spotting the early signs can help you intervene and get your child the proper treatment.

  • Person looking into the distance

    The Relationship Between Bulimia, Acne, Rashes, and Skin Issues

    Bulimia and acne are closely related. Bingeing and purging can harm your skin in visible and persistent ways, and it’s hard to clear up acne while your eating disorder persists.

    Bulimia can cause other unsightly changes to your skin too. And sometimes, those problems are so noticeable that your friends and family ask questions.

Research & Data

Explore the many original research and data collection projects we have conducted

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are one of the most dangerous types of mental health disorder, responsible for an estimated 10,200 deaths every year. There are a number of different types of eating disorders, which all impact people in different ways.


  • Person looking at statistics

    Statistics on Anorexia in Men & Boys

    The numbers around men with anorexia and eating disorders may be misleading. For example, a frequently quoted statistic is that 10% of anorexia cases are male, but even that statistic may be inaccurate, with some studies indicating the ratio may be higher.

  • Medications for anorexia

    Commonly Prescribed Medications for Anorexia 

    At present, there is no single medication for anorexia that can replace the benefits therapies can provide. However, some medications can address a few of the mental health symptoms many people with anorexia develop.

  • The Connection Between Anorexia & Genetics 

    Anorexia and genetics have a connection, although researchers aren’t exactly sure in what way.  If you have people in your immediate family who suffer from anorexia or other eating disorders, be mindful of that fact and consider adopting healthy habits to reduce your risk of developing an eating disorder yourself.

  • Woman with an idea

    Bulimia vs. Binge Eating: Key Differences

    Bulimia and binge eating disorder have a lot in common. Both involve episodes of bingeing, and both can be associated with weight gain. But there are significant differences between these two common eating disorders.

  • Patient with a doctor

    Levels of Treatment for Anorexia

    There are many levels of anorexia nervosa treatment. Often, the best way to begin is by talking to an eating disorder specialist and determining what kind of therapy will work best for your health and circumstances.

  • Person with anorexia

    Anorexia Facts & Myths: What You Need to Know

    Anorexia is a complex condition that is plagued by a lot of misinformation online. For instance, many people think of anorexia as a condition affecting only women, but that isn’t true. 

    We’ve outlined some important anorexia facts and myths below. And we cover some tips on the best ways to avoid further misinformation when doing your own research online.

Treatment Information

The most effective treatment for bulimia nervosa is the one that restores your physical and mental health while keeping you safe. Almost half of all people with bulimia seek out treatment, and all of them should get individualized care. 


  • Medications for anorexia

    Commonly Prescribed Medications for Anorexia 

    At present, there is no single medication for anorexia that can replace the benefits therapies can provide. However, some medications can address a few of the mental health symptoms many people with anorexia develop.

  • woman in nature

    Bulimia Treatment Centers: Costs & Insurance Coverage

    All across the United States, bulimia treatment centers help people overcome damaging impulses, habits, and behaviors. Each one is slightly different, but all share some core attributes.

  • Medical professional

    How to Treat Bulimia: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals 

    Bulimia is a severe mental health disorder, but it responds to treatment. The sooner you spot the signs and enroll a patient in care, the more likely it is that the person will make a full recovery.

  • Doctor's office

    Medication for Bulimia: Commonly Prescribed Medicines

    Bulimia medication could be part of your recovery plan. Prescription and over-the-counter drugs can ease physical symptoms, reduce urges, and help you feel better. 

    Researchers say bulimia medications are generally helpful. [1] One medication, fluoxetine, is FDA-approved for bulimia treatment. Your doctor can dip into other options if you don’t respond to this treatment.

  • Person visiting a doctor's office

    What Happens to the Body After Recovering From Bulimia?

    Before bulimia and after—you can probably split your life into these two parts, and chances are, you’d like the “after” part to begin as quickly as possible. Recovery from bulimia isn’t quick, and most people need months (or years) to complete the process. [1] But your hard work is worthwhile.

  • Mental illness

    Treating Bulimia and Co-Occurring Mental Illness

    It’s not uncommon for someone with bulimia to suffer from a co-occurring mental health disorder. Sometimes an eating disorder will develop after a different mental health condition, or the conditions may start simultaneously. In either instance, treatments are available to help individuals with bulimia and a co-occurring mental illness.